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Daily Archives: December 3, 2012

Govt proposes new norms for funding solar projects under Phase II

An ordinary maize field with a modern variety growing close to the town of Jala, Nayarit, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the past, maize landraces (traditional famer varieties) were the basis of Jala's agriculture, including the giant Jala maize landrace, famous for producing the world's largest ears. However, improved varieties are inexorably supplanting the landraces. They are shorter, which makes them easier to manage and less prone to falling over (lodging) in high winds, and yield much more (around 7-8 tons of grain per hectare, compared to around 3 tons per hectare for landrace maize). Even more importantly, the improved varieties grown in Jala give relatively high yields of husks, which are exported to the USA and the rest of Mexico for wrapping tamales, a popular Mexican dish. The valley?s climate is changing, and the reduced rainfall also favors improved varieties, which reach maturity in around four to five months and thus can be sown in drier soils, after the rains begin. As a result less than 5% of the Jala?s maize-growing area is currently sown to the Jala landrace. Maize itself is also being replaced by cash crops, predominantly blue agave for tequila and tobacco.Photo credit: Eloise Phipps/CIMMYT.For more about Jala maize, see CIMMYT's August 2007 e-news story "Pride and pragmatism sustain a giant Mexican maize," available online at: http://www.cimmyt.org/newsletter/63-2007/180-pride-and-pragmatism-sustain-a-giant-mexican-maize.

According to reports, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy has come out with proposed norms for viability gap funding (VGF) for large-sized solar power projects that would come up in Phase II of the National Solar Mission. VGF will be made available for certain specified capacity solar projects — say, 750 MW or 1,000 MW — according to the draft policy document on National Solar Mission, Phase II, released today. The tariff at which such projects will sell solar power ... Read More »

Financial institutions ‘keen but cautious’ on wind energy projects

An ordinary maize field with a modern variety growing close to the town of Jala, Nayarit, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the past, maize landraces (traditional famer varieties) were the basis of Jala's agriculture, including the giant Jala maize landrace, famous for producing the world's largest ears. However, improved varieties are inexorably supplanting the landraces. They are shorter, which makes them easier to manage and less prone to falling over (lodging) in high winds, and yield much more (around 7-8 tons of grain per hectare, compared to around 3 tons per hectare for landrace maize). Even more importantly, the improved varieties grown in Jala give relatively high yields of husks, which are exported to the USA and the rest of Mexico for wrapping tamales, a popular Mexican dish. The valley?s climate is changing, and the reduced rainfall also favors improved varieties, which reach maturity in around four to five months and thus can be sown in drier soils, after the rains begin. As a result less than 5% of the Jala?s maize-growing area is currently sown to the Jala landrace. Maize itself is also being replaced by cash crops, predominantly blue agave for tequila and tobacco.Photo credit: Eloise Phipps/CIMMYT.For more about Jala maize, see CIMMYT's August 2007 e-news story "Pride and pragmatism sustain a giant Mexican maize," available online at: http://www.cimmyt.org/newsletter/63-2007/180-pride-and-pragmatism-sustain-a-giant-mexican-maize.

According to reports, financial viability of distribution licensees, evacuation infrastructure gaps and project approvals are he constraints to utility-scale wind energy projects sourcing funds, according to senior executives in financial institutions and private equity funds. As independent power producers take the lead in investing in the wind energy sector, the project viability is primarily dependent on their ability to sell power, even more so than incentives to attract investments. Financial institutions are partial to projects based on feed-in (incentive) tariff because ... Read More »

Wide scope for tapping solar power in Tamil Nadu

An ordinary maize field with a modern variety growing close to the town of Jala, Nayarit, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the past, maize landraces (traditional famer varieties) were the basis of Jala's agriculture, including the giant Jala maize landrace, famous for producing the world's largest ears. However, improved varieties are inexorably supplanting the landraces. They are shorter, which makes them easier to manage and less prone to falling over (lodging) in high winds, and yield much more (around 7-8 tons of grain per hectare, compared to around 3 tons per hectare for landrace maize). Even more importantly, the improved varieties grown in Jala give relatively high yields of husks, which are exported to the USA and the rest of Mexico for wrapping tamales, a popular Mexican dish. The valley?s climate is changing, and the reduced rainfall also favors improved varieties, which reach maturity in around four to five months and thus can be sown in drier soils, after the rains begin. As a result less than 5% of the Jala?s maize-growing area is currently sown to the Jala landrace. Maize itself is also being replaced by cash crops, predominantly blue agave for tequila and tobacco.Photo credit: Eloise Phipps/CIMMYT.For more about Jala maize, see CIMMYT's August 2007 e-news story "Pride and pragmatism sustain a giant Mexican maize," available online at: http://www.cimmyt.org/newsletter/63-2007/180-pride-and-pragmatism-sustain-a-giant-mexican-maize.

According to reports, while Gujarat and Rajasthan lead the country in solar power generation , there is wide scope for tapping solar power in Tamil Nadu, said S.Raghu Vatsa Chari, Chief Regional Manager, Indian Overseas Bank, here on Wednesday. Speaking at a meeting on renewable energy – solar power – organised by the Thanjavur Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Mr.Chari said that Gujarat generated 900 MW of solar power while Tamil Nadu generated only 12 MW. There is wide scope for ... Read More »

Centre to step in to support wind power firms

An ordinary maize field with a modern variety growing close to the town of Jala, Nayarit, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the past, maize landraces (traditional famer varieties) were the basis of Jala's agriculture, including the giant Jala maize landrace, famous for producing the world's largest ears. However, improved varieties are inexorably supplanting the landraces. They are shorter, which makes them easier to manage and less prone to falling over (lodging) in high winds, and yield much more (around 7-8 tons of grain per hectare, compared to around 3 tons per hectare for landrace maize). Even more importantly, the improved varieties grown in Jala give relatively high yields of husks, which are exported to the USA and the rest of Mexico for wrapping tamales, a popular Mexican dish. The valley?s climate is changing, and the reduced rainfall also favors improved varieties, which reach maturity in around four to five months and thus can be sown in drier soils, after the rains begin. As a result less than 5% of the Jala?s maize-growing area is currently sown to the Jala landrace. Maize itself is also being replaced by cash crops, predominantly blue agave for tequila and tobacco.Photo credit: Eloise Phipps/CIMMYT.For more about Jala maize, see CIMMYT's August 2007 e-news story "Pride and pragmatism sustain a giant Mexican maize," available online at: http://www.cimmyt.org/newsletter/63-2007/180-pride-and-pragmatism-sustain-a-giant-mexican-maize.

According to reports, the central government is looking at stepping in to support the wind power producers who has been waiting for long to recover bills from some of the power distribution companies, said Farooq Abdullah, Union Minister of New and Renewable Energy. The Union minister also said said that the centre would support the energy producers from the National Clean Energy Fund to overcome the financial issues faced due to the non payment of discoms. “There are companies which has ... Read More »

Haryana fails to meet renewable energy target

An ordinary maize field with a modern variety growing close to the town of Jala, Nayarit, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the past, maize landraces (traditional famer varieties) were the basis of Jala's agriculture, including the giant Jala maize landrace, famous for producing the world's largest ears. However, improved varieties are inexorably supplanting the landraces. They are shorter, which makes them easier to manage and less prone to falling over (lodging) in high winds, and yield much more (around 7-8 tons of grain per hectare, compared to around 3 tons per hectare for landrace maize). Even more importantly, the improved varieties grown in Jala give relatively high yields of husks, which are exported to the USA and the rest of Mexico for wrapping tamales, a popular Mexican dish. The valley?s climate is changing, and the reduced rainfall also favors improved varieties, which reach maturity in around four to five months and thus can be sown in drier soils, after the rains begin. As a result less than 5% of the Jala?s maize-growing area is currently sown to the Jala landrace. Maize itself is also being replaced by cash crops, predominantly blue agave for tequila and tobacco.Photo credit: Eloise Phipps/CIMMYT.For more about Jala maize, see CIMMYT's August 2007 e-news story "Pride and pragmatism sustain a giant Mexican maize," available online at: http://www.cimmyt.org/newsletter/63-2007/180-pride-and-pragmatism-sustain-a-giant-mexican-maize.

According to reports, the Haryana Renewable Energy Development Agency ( HAREDA) has failed to meet its own target to harness power from non-conventional sources. The State Renewable Energy Policy, mentions Haryana government’s aim of achieving 10% of the total capacity addition of 5,000 MW of conventional power to be generated through renewable energy power projects by 2012. However, till date 164.10 Mw of electricity has been generated through non-conventional sources. Read More »

Despite setbacks, Khosla’s loyalties lie with cleantech

An ordinary maize field with a modern variety growing close to the town of Jala, Nayarit, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the past, maize landraces (traditional famer varieties) were the basis of Jala's agriculture, including the giant Jala maize landrace, famous for producing the world's largest ears. However, improved varieties are inexorably supplanting the landraces. They are shorter, which makes them easier to manage and less prone to falling over (lodging) in high winds, and yield much more (around 7-8 tons of grain per hectare, compared to around 3 tons per hectare for landrace maize). Even more importantly, the improved varieties grown in Jala give relatively high yields of husks, which are exported to the USA and the rest of Mexico for wrapping tamales, a popular Mexican dish. The valley?s climate is changing, and the reduced rainfall also favors improved varieties, which reach maturity in around four to five months and thus can be sown in drier soils, after the rains begin. As a result less than 5% of the Jala?s maize-growing area is currently sown to the Jala landrace. Maize itself is also being replaced by cash crops, predominantly blue agave for tequila and tobacco.Photo credit: Eloise Phipps/CIMMYT.For more about Jala maize, see CIMMYT's August 2007 e-news story "Pride and pragmatism sustain a giant Mexican maize," available online at: http://www.cimmyt.org/newsletter/63-2007/180-pride-and-pragmatism-sustain-a-giant-mexican-maize.

According to reports, Vinod Khosla crowed about the clean energy industry last year. Three of the biofuel startups in his venture capital portfolio had gone public, and the stocks had risen considerably after their debuts. “I challenge anybody to claim that clean tech done right is a disaster,” Khosla said at a conference, rebuffing recent criticism. “We’ve generated more profits there than anybody has.” Since then, Khosla, founder of Khosla Ventures, has watched much of those paper gains evaporate. As the ... Read More »

L&T’s 8.7 MW Wind Farm Secures CDM status from UNFCCC

An ordinary maize field with a modern variety growing close to the town of Jala, Nayarit, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the past, maize landraces (traditional famer varieties) were the basis of Jala's agriculture, including the giant Jala maize landrace, famous for producing the world's largest ears. However, improved varieties are inexorably supplanting the landraces. They are shorter, which makes them easier to manage and less prone to falling over (lodging) in high winds, and yield much more (around 7-8 tons of grain per hectare, compared to around 3 tons per hectare for landrace maize). Even more importantly, the improved varieties grown in Jala give relatively high yields of husks, which are exported to the USA and the rest of Mexico for wrapping tamales, a popular Mexican dish. The valley?s climate is changing, and the reduced rainfall also favors improved varieties, which reach maturity in around four to five months and thus can be sown in drier soils, after the rains begin. As a result less than 5% of the Jala?s maize-growing area is currently sown to the Jala landrace. Maize itself is also being replaced by cash crops, predominantly blue agave for tequila and tobacco.Photo credit: Eloise Phipps/CIMMYT.For more about Jala maize, see CIMMYT's August 2007 e-news story "Pride and pragmatism sustain a giant Mexican maize," available online at: http://www.cimmyt.org/newsletter/63-2007/180-pride-and-pragmatism-sustain-a-giant-mexican-maize.

The Wind Energy Project of L&T Infrastructure Development Projects Limited (L&T IDPL) has secured the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) status from United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Bonn, Germany. It has registered L&T IDPL for receiving Certified Emission Reduction (CER) certificates every year up to 2022. The 8.7 MW of Wind Energy Generators installed by the Company generates Green Power which caters to substantial captive consumption by L&T’s establishments in Tamil Nadu. The National CDM Authority – Ministry ... Read More »

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